Liam Philley, shot by Steve Carty

Liam Philley, shot by Steve Carty

Liam’s love of photography started at the same time as he learned to walk.  When he wasn’t draining the batteries on his father’s Minolta SLR and flash unit, he roamed around with a Kodak EK6 instant camera, which became a fixture in whichever hand his favourite blanket wasn’t occupying.  As a young man in the 80’s, Liam’s appetite for composing images continued, most notably during a visit to his Aunt Patty and Uncle Johnny in Ireland.  While crisscrossing the Emerald Isle by train, many rolls of film were spent capturing the country side from a moving train while experimenting with manual control of the camera.  Travel photography would become his creative outlet for the next two decades of his life.  

In the 1990’s, Liam chose a career in technology, starting in management consulting and, later, internet services, travelling the world for work, with the camera often on hand.  It wasn't until 2010, when, on a whim, Liam enrolled, part-time, in a photography program at George Brown College, initially with the intention to stay distracted from another dreary Canadian winter.  By the summer of 2010, he was hooked and made a commitment to the two-year program.  For electives, he specialized in studio photography (lighting and concepts), colour management (digital printing and reproduction), and the business of photography. In the spring of 2012, Liam was awarded a certificate in Digital Photography upon completion of the program.  

In the summer of 2012, Liam left behind his first career to focus on developing a new career as a commercial photographer.

Outside of commercial work, Liam is always composing imagery for his art photography portfolio.  A prevailing theme is the exploration of his surroundings from an often overlooked point of view.   This body of work results from a mix of curiosity for lifelong passions; technology, travel, architecture and cycling, and a willingness to bend the rules of composition.  By employing unconventional photographic techniques, while emphasizing visual structures; geometric patterns, lines, textures, atmospheres, the results promise to give the viewer a visual that is open to individual evaluation and presentation.